Graphic Design for Bloggers

As bloggers, we are tasked with adding graphics to our posts, the problem is that most of us are not trained in graphic design.  So what’s a blogger to do?  Fortunately, there are several platforms which make creating graphics and graphic design for bloggers as easy as click and type.  Today, I am sharing the features of both Canva and Designsta and what I use each of them for.

Canva has grown in popularity over the past few years.  With free and paid versions, you don’t have to break the bank to create high-quality graphics for your blog.

Here’s a quick comparison of the free and paid versions: (from the Canva pricing page)

graphics for bloggers

As you can see, the paid version gives you several additional benefits including Magic Resize (which automatically resizes your graphic to work on different sites – for example, converting a social media ad to a Pinterest graphic), as well as adding brand fonts and colors so that you don’t have to enter them every time you create a graphic.  With the paid version, you are also able to upload as many images as you want without fear of running out of storage. With the free version, you are quite limited in what you can do.

I have the paid version. I love Canva for creating beautiful graphics for blog post titles and social media posts – however, I don’t love it for creating printables or Pinterest graphics.

When creating printables (and I create a LOT of printables for my readers), Canva is not only cumbersome, but many of the images and templates have very limited editing  making it difficult or impossible to create consistent branding across printables.

Here are two printables that I created:

As you can see, the Designsta one is clearly more “on brand” than the Canva one.

With Designsta, the platform was created to enable female entrepreneurs and bloggers the ability to create beautiful, branded assets (from logos to web banners and from planner pages to infographics) with ease. There are thousands of free images and hundreds of printables.

Graphic Design Comparison for Bloggers

Both:

allow you to customize the graphic size

allow you to download your project as a jpeg, png or PDF

use “drag and drop” to create stunning projects

allow you to upload your own images

graphic design

Canva

Pros

With paid version, can store brand assets

Auto resize for graphics

Tons of templates and images to use

Less costly than Designsta at 12.95 per month

Ability to create clickable links on project

Easy to “group” many elements to change the color or font in just a few clicks

Cons

Cumbersome for creating printables

Most templates and images cost an additional $1 to use

Customer support slow to respond

Feedback non-existent in user Facebook group

Many images and graphics are not editable

A pain to center items on page

Owner of Three Happy Turtles, Audrey Tipper, shared this about using Canva “”I enjoy the user friendly functionality of Canva, but it is limited if you’re not willing to pay a few dollars for graphics now and then.”  

Brittany May, owner of Simply Your Life,  had this to say “While I love it because it is an amazing tool for quick, easy and professional looking graphics, the layouts are becoming recognizable in business because it’s gotten so popular to use”

Designsta

 

Pros

Amazing customer support

Regular training videos added to learn new features

Private Facebook group for feedback and support from company and other users

Ability to create branded worksheets and printables for consistency across projects

Fully editable images and graphics

Super easy to center elements on page

Each month a design bundle with over 100 elements is released to members for free.

Can upload brand logos and other graphics (fonts through Designsta) for use in cohesive branding

Cons

A bit of a learning curve

Cannot create clickable links on platform (requires use of PDF Escape or similar)

Pricier than Canva at $25 per month

Alex Sheach, website design of Perefected by Alex says that “Designsta saves me so much time/money. If i were paying on Fiverr it would soon mount up especially in case of revisions., but I do think it’s got a bit t of a learning curve because i don’t find the menu structure intuitive”

Katie Tove, clearly a big fan of Designsta shared that ”

 

While, I currently have paid accounts with both Canva and Designsta, as I learn Designsta a bit more, I can see me dropping Canva, altogether very shortly.  Yes, it is a bit pricier, but the capabilities of it, in my opinion, far outweigh any cons.

What graphic design platform for bloggers do you use?

To follow along on my blogging journey see this post

For a comparison of Blogger and WordPress, see this post.

Because of Him,

Sue

 

 

Did you enjoy this? Please share!Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on TumblrEmail this to someoneShare on StumbleUpon